Bury St. Edmunds day trip

Some photos from our trip to Bury St. Edmunds (or Edmunds St. Bury and St. Bury Edmunds as my mom called it).

Our first stop was at a textile shop called Wibbling Wools. They had some beautiful yarns and handmade items. Lena decided to kick off our visit with her signature scream so we quickly removed her from her stroller and took her upstairs to walk around. Luckily, the shop owner was gracious about it but as soon as we walked out the door, I noticed her retracing our footsteps to make sure nothing was destroyed.

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Just around the corner is Bury St. Edmunds Cathedral and the entrance to Abbey Gardens. The gate dates back to the 1300s and was actually destroyed by the townspeople in 1327 but later rebuilt.

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In the summertime, this entire snow covered area blooms with gorgeous flowers and manicured lawns. Or so I’ve read; the frostbite on my toes and fingers is making me skeptical.

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We stopped for lunch at a little placed called Scandinavian Coffee House – it was an obvious choice given our self-appointed status as International Nordic Ambassadors. The food was delicious and the people were even nicer. I never know how a meal will go when the Diva is along but thankfully, she did pretty well. Our waitress was a gentle, older English woman who magically produced children’s toys for Lena to play with. This has never happened to me before and it made for a semi-relaxing lunch. After eating, we went on the hunt for some sugar and happened upon this window of treats. I really wish it was socially acceptable to be hugely fat because I could live off of pastries with no problem. If fat were vogue, I feel confident that I’d be one of the most stylish people you know. Maybe someday…

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I had read a review that the Moyse’s Hall was kid friendly so we finished off our day with a tour of the museum.

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The first floor had some period costumes for kids to play dress-up. So I made the obvious choice to let Lena model an outfit. You can see her excitement below.

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I didn’t get a chance to read all the placards as I was busy chasing my mini-me but I still managed to catch a little bit of the exhibit. Bury St. Edmunds has a large history of witchcraft and murders and they would publicly display the bodies of those convicted of crimes. They also did standard post-mortem autopsies and believed heavily in phrenology as a means of determining who was a threat to society. The creepiest display was an iron body holder (for lack of a better description) where offenders were hung out for all to see. I can’t even imagine what life must have been like not to mention the stink!

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Moyse’s Hall is a medieval building – I loved all the oddly shaped rooms and strange hallways. The ceiling was incredible; I had to get a picture.

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I’d recommend the museum especially if your kids are a bit older. This review from TripAdvisor summed it up perfectly:

“The Moyse’s Hall Museum is one of England’s few surviving Norman houses and it is believed to be the oldest town house in East Anglia (it dates from around 1180).  The Museum has a fine selection of unsavoury items such as man-traps, gibbet cages, mummified cats and wrinkled shoes – built into the walls of houses to ward off evil spirits.  Most chilling of all, relics of the Murder in the Red Barn, celebrated in Victorian melodrama, including the guilty William Corder’s scalp and a book bound in his skin!”

Definitely check it out if you’re in Bury St. Edmunds!

By | 2017-02-10T17:07:20+00:00 January 26th, 2013|Days Out, Personal|0 Comments

About the Author:

Wife, mama, graphic designer, and documentary photographer. Never met a piece of chocolate I didn't like. I love celebrating special occasions, exploring new cities through their local cuisine, and kissing my babies incessantly.

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